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Multiple discrimination

Multiple discrimination

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DISCRIMINATION can take many different forms.

Amongst other things, discrimination can be direct, indirect, multiple, intentional, unintentional, based on association with a person to whom a prohibited ground applies, and based on the perception of a person having a characteristic associated with a prohibited ground.

In today’s article, we will be briefly looking at the concept of multiple discrimination.

According to article 5 of the Declaration of Principles on Equality: “Discrimination must be prohibited where it is on grounds of race, colour, ethnicity, descent, sex, pregnancy, maternity, civil, family or carer status, language, religion or belief, political or other opinion, birth, national or social origin, nationality, economic status, association with a national minority, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, health status, genetic or other predisposition toward illness or a combination of any of these grounds, or on the basis of characteristics associated with any of these grounds”.

The concept of multiple discrimination recognises that persons can be discriminated against based on more than one ground that is part of or perceived to be a part of their identity.

Each human being is different from the other in some way, shape or form.

Because of the diversity that exists in humanity, each individual has different layers to their identity and may have certain characteristics, or be perceived by others to have certain characteristics, including but not limited to those based on race, colour, ethnicity, descent, sex, pregnancy, maternity, civil, family or carer status, language, religion or belief, political or other opinion, birth, national or social origin, nationality, economic status, association with a national minority, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, health status, genetic or other predisposition toward illness.

For example, a person who is discriminated on the grounds of their sex may also suffer discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation, race, disability, and so on.

They are therefore facing

multiple forms of discrimination at the same time based on different characteristics that are a part of or perceived to be a part of their identity.

Today, I encourage us to continue to learn about the different forms of discrimination and in particular, multiple discrimination. Let us work together to end all forms of discrimination in SVG, especially against vulnerable groups in Vincentian

society.

Author: Jeshua Bardoo is a Vincentian Barrister- at-law and Solicitor.

He is the President of Equal Rights,Access and Opportunities SVG Inc. He also has an LLM in International Human Rights Law. He can be contacted via e-mail at jeshuabardoo

Multiple discrimination

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